Canopy’s CEO is Grossly Misrepresenting Overemployment

In a recent memo to employees, Canopy’s CEO falsely claimed that the company does not have an overemployment problem. This is a gross misrepresentation of the facts and an insult to the intelligence of Canopy’s employees.

Canopy’s CEO is grossly misrepresenting the company’s overemployment problem. In a recent memo to employees, the CEO claimed that the company does have an overemployment problem and call it a new form of stealing. This is simply not true.

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What I Learned from Being Overemployed…

When I was employed by two different organizations, both of whom allow me to work from the comfort of my own home. And while there are certainly some perks to this type of arrangement (no commute! pajamas all day!), there are also some things that I’ve had to learn the hard way. Here are a few lessons I’ve learned from my experience working from home.

Lesson 1: Be very strategic with your work schedules to assure all your assigned duties for both jobs are handled timely in your schedule timeblocks. Balancing two jobs can be tough, but with a little bit of strategic planning, it is possible to complete all your work on time. Here are a few tips for creating a work schedule that will help you stay organized and productive.

First, try to plan out your work hours for both jobs so that they overlap as little as possible. This way, you can focus on one task at a time without having to switch gears constantly. Second, make sure you allocate enough time for each task. If you know you need eight hours to finish a project at one job, don’t try to squeeze it into six hours at the other job. Lastly, be realistic about how much time you can actually devote to each task. There’s no use in promising yourself that you’ll work twelve hour days when you know that’s not going to happen.”

Lesson 2: Focus on the specific financial goals driving you to be overemployed.
Are you working two jobs to make ends meet? Are you finding it difficult to focus on your work when you’re also trying to take care of the household responsibilities? If so, here are some tips to help you better manage your time and stay focused on your goals. First, be realistic about how much time you can devote to each job. Second, establish specific deadlines for each job and stick to them. Third, create a schedule that outlines when you will work on each task. Fourth, keep a positive attitude and don’t get overwhelmed by the workload. Finally, take breaks when necessary and reward yourself for a job well done. By following these tips, you can effectively manage multiple jobs and achieve your goals!

Lesson 3: Establish your support system at home while you are overemployed.
With both my partner and I working full-time jobs, it can be hard to find time for each other. Adding in a third job – being a stay-at-home mom – can feel impossible. But with careful planning, a personal support system with family, and realistic goals, it is manageable. Here are some tips that have helped us make the most of our time together.

First and foremost, try to schedule regular date nights (or days) where you put everything else aside and focus on each other. Whether it’s taking a walk around the block, cooking dinner together, or just cuddling on the couch watching your favorite show, this time is essential for maintaining intimacy and connection.
Make sure you also carve out some one-on-one time with each child as well – even if it’s just 10 or 15 minutes before bed reading stories or playing games. This helps them feel special and loved, which will only benefit them in the long run. Finally, don’t be afraid to ask family members for help when needed. Whether it’s watching the kids for an afternoon so you can catch up on errands or folding laundry while you take a break, they’ll likely be more than happy to lend a hand.
By following these tips we’ve been able to maintain our relationship while working two full-time jobs…and being parents! Juggling everything can be tough but it’s definitely doable with a little bit of effort.”

Lesson 4: Budget the additional funds overemployment provides wisely
Now that you have extra money coming in from your two remote jobs, it’s important to budget it wisely. Here are some tips for how to best use your additional income:
1) Determine what your priorities are and create a budget accordingly.
2) If you have any debts, focus on paying them off as quickly as possible.
3) save for rainy day fund – you never know when you might need it!
4) invest in yourself by using the money to take courses or buy materials that will help you advance in your career.
5) enjoy yourself and treat yourself to something nice every once in a while! After all, you’ve earned it!

Lesson 5: Keep your “overemployment” status private, especially from co-workers at either jobs.
The best-kept secret in the working world is having a 2nd job. Whether it’s to make extra money or just to have something to do, a 2nd job can be a great way to keep your finances stable and your days full. But one thing you need to remember is that keeping your 2nd job private is key, especially from co-workers at either job. Here are some tips on how to do just that.

1) Don’t tell anyone at your primary job about your 2nd job. This includes friends, family members, and even co-workers. The fewer people who know about it, the better. You never know who might accidentally let something slip out of curiosity or gossiping.
2) Keep your schedule for both jobs separate as much as possible. This means not overlapping shift hours, taking different days off work, etc. If people at either job start getting suspicious that you’re never around when they expect you to be, they may start asking questions that you don’t want to answer.
3) Be discreet with how often you talk about your 2nd job online or in person. Don’t post about it on social media, and try not to bring it up too often when talking with people outside of work (unless they already know). Again, the less attention you draw to it, the better.
4) Make sure any evidence of your 2nd job is hidden or removed from view if someone does ask about it unexpectedly . For example, if you have flyers for interviews or resumes lying around your house, put them away before anyone comes over; if you have a laptop open displaying an employment website while at home, close it quickly; and so forth.”

Lesson 6: Celebrate your small financial milestones while being overemployed.
What’s the best way to make money feel like less of a grind? Celebrate your small financial milestones along the way! As someone who’s juggling two remote jobs, I know that every little bit helps. Here are some ideas for how you can celebrate your own small wins.

Whether it’s saving up for a rainy day fund or paying off debt, every step in the right direction is something to be proud of. So take a moment to pat yourself on the back and enjoy your accomplishments! Small victories add up over time, so keep up the good work. 🙂

Lesson 7: Get some rest!
I’d encourage anyone who has the opportunity to work remotely, even if it’s just for a little while. It really opens your eyes to how much you can get done outside of a traditional office setting – and that there are so many opportunities out there if you’re willing to look for them. If you’re thinking about making the switch to working remotely full-time, I say go for it! Just be prepared to put in a little extra effort upfront to make sure everything runs smoothly.

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It’s Time to Leave that Job…Now!!

If you’re feeling overwhelmed and stressed out in your job, it might be time to resign. It’s not worth sacrificing your mental health for a paycheck – you can find something else that will make you happier. Plus, giving yourself some time away from work can make you even more appealing to future employers. So if the job is stressing you out, don’t be afraid to walk away. You’ll be glad you did.

If your job is giving you ulcers, it might be time to hand in your two weeks notice. Let’s face it, we’ve all been there. Your boss is breathing down your neck, deadlines are looming and you’re pretty sure you’re going to get fired if things don’t shape up soon. But before you start packing up your desk, there are a few things you should consider. First, is this job really worth the stress? If it’s not, then it’s probably time to move on. Second, have you tried talking to your boss about the situation? It’s possible that they’re unaware of how stressed out you are. If you’ve tried everything and you’re still not happy, then quitting might be the best option. But whatever you do, don’t make a rash decision – think carefully about what’s best for you before you hand in your notice.

Working in a toxic work environment can be soul-sucking and energy-draining. If you find yourself in this situation, it’s time to resign, unless of course you enjoy being constantly stressed and on the verge of a breakdown. A toxic work environment can take a toll on your mental and physical health, so it’s important to get out as soon as possible. Here are some signs that it’s time to resign:

– You dread going to work every day
– You’re constantly stressed out
– You’re not getting any joy or satisfaction from your job
– Your health is suffering as a result of the stress

If you can relate to any of these points, then it’s time to start looking for a new job. A toxic work environment is not worth sacrificing your wellbeing for. Leave!

If you find yourself constantly second-guessing your decisions, questioning your worth, and generally feeling like you’re never quite good enough, it might be time to consider finding a new job – or at the very least, a new boss. Because chances are, you’re working for a narcissistic boss.

Narcissistic bosses are characterized by an inflated sense of self-importance, a need for constant admiration, and a complete lack of empathy. They’re also incredibly difficult to work for. So if you’re stuck working for someone who ticks all of those boxes, it’s time to start looking for a way out.

That doesn’t mean quitting without notice – although in some cases, that might be the best option. But however you do it, getting away from a narcissistic boss is one of the best things you can do for your career – and your mental health.

If you’re working for a company that’s up to no good, it might be time to hand in your notice. After all, life is too short to spend your days working for a criminal enterprise. Of course, it can be tough to know if your employer is breaking the law. Here are a few things to look out for:

– Are you being asked to do things that make you feel uncomfortable?
– Do you have a sneaking suspicion that something isn’t quite right?
– Are you worried that you could get into trouble if the authorities found out what was going on?

If you answered ‘yes’ to any of these questions, it’s probably time to start looking for a new job. After all, it’s not worth risking your freedom for a company that doesn’t have your best interests at heart. So, if you think your employer is up to no good, don’t wait around – leave ASAP!

Whether you’re getting stressed out at the thought of going to work, feeling like your work environment is toxic or dealing with illegal activities or dealing with a narcissistic boss…none of those things are worth giving up your sanity. It might be time to resign if the job is stressing you out, dealing with a narcissistic boss or the company conducting illegal activities. If that’s the case, then don’t hesitate to reach out for additional help. I’m here to support you through your career transition and beyond. To get your resume reviewed, revised or redone to get that new job, click here to start the process.

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Risks of Overemployment!

If you’re like me, the idea of overemployed is pretty appealing. It would mean I could work from anywhere I want and never have to worry about finding a new job again. But before you quit your day job to start applying for your dream position, there are a few things you should consider. Being overemployed can be risky, especially if one of them is your main source of income. Here are a few things to keep in mind before make the switch.

#1 If one or both employers find out you are overemployed
What should you do if your boss finds out you have a second job? What if they discover you’ve been working remotely for another company? The first thing to do is stay calm. There’s no need to panic or make any rash decisions. If your boss asks you about it, be honest and open with them. Explain that you’re passionate about your work and that you’re looking for ways to challenge yourself. You may also want to mention that you’re doing it for the extra income. If your boss is okay with it, great! If not, you may need to choose between the two jobs. Ultimately, it’s up to you which job is more important to you. But if you can find a way to keep both, that’s even better!

#2 Check for Non-Compete Agreements
If you’re thinking about taking on a remote job, there’s one potential pitfall you’ll want to avoid: non-compete agreements. What are non-compete agreements? They’re basically contracts that prevent you from working for a competitor of your current employer. And if you have one, it could limit your ability to take on a new remote job.

So how can you tell if you have a non-compete agreement? The best way is to check your employment contract. If it includes language about not working for a competitor, then you have a non-compete agreement. Alternatively, you can ask your employer directly. They should be able to tell you if you’re bound by a non-compete agreement or not.

If you do have a non-compete agreement, that doesn’t necessarily mean you can’t take on a remote job. However, you’ll need to be careful about which job you choose. Make sure that the company you’re considering is not in direct competition with your current employer. Otherwise, you could find yourself in violation of your contract.

Bottom line: if you’re thinking about getting a remote job, take the time to check for non-compete agreements.

#3 If the employer(s) find out about your overemployment…just be honest
So, you’ve been caught with your hand in the cookie jar – or, more accurately, with two remote jobs. What should you do?
First, take a deep breath. It’s not the end of the world. You can handle this. Next, sit down with your employer and explain the situation honestly. They may be understanding and give you some leeway. Or they may not be happy about it, but as long as you’re upfront with them, they’ll respect your honesty. Finally, depending on your employer’s reaction, you may need to choose between your two jobs. If they’re both great opportunities, it’s up to you to decide which one you want to keep. But if one is clearly better than the other, maybe it’s time to cut your losses and focus on the job that’s a better fit for you.

#4 Keep Your Overemployed Status to Yourself
If you’re working two remote jobs, there’s no need to tell your coworkers. In fact, it’s probably best to keep it a secret. Here are a few reasons why: First, you’ll be able to get twice as much work done if your coworkers aren’t constantly coming to you with questions or distractions. Second, you’ll be able to focus better if you’re not worrying about what your coworkers think of you. And finally, if word gets out that you’re working two jobs, you may find yourself in the position of having to justify why you’re doing it. So save yourself the hassle and keep your second job a secret. Your coworkers will thank you for it.

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Why Are Employers Resisting Overemployment & Remote Work

It’s no secret that the traditional nine-to-five workday is no longer standard. In today’s economy, many workers are juggling multiple jobs in order to make ends meet. As a result, employers are increasingly resistant to the idea of their employees being overemployed. After all, why would an employer want to provide the same benefits and pay for an employee who is only working half the time? However, there are a few advantages to being overemployed. For one, it can help to increase productivity levels, as workers are able to focus on one task at a time without the distractions of a busy office. Additionally, working two jobs remotely can also help to reduce stress levels, as employees can more easily manage their time and take breaks when needed. Ultimately, while employers may be resistant to the idea of their employees working two jobs remotely, there are a few advantages that may make it worth their while.

Article reference about remote work | Joshua Fluke’s YouTube Channel

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Want to be Successfully Overemployed? Do these 3 Things

Working two jobs used to be considered a bad thing, but in today’s economy, it can be a great way to boost your income and get ahead in your career. If you’re looking for ways to make ends meet, or just want to find a better job, working two remote jobs can be the perfect solution. Here are some of the benefits of working two remote jobs:

You’ll have more flexibility and control over your schedule.
You’ll have more options when it comes to choosing your employers.
You’ll be able to make more money.
You’ll have more opportunities for advancement.
And best of all, you’ll be able to enjoy greater work-life balance.

If you’re looking for a way to earn a little extra money, you might want to consider getting two remote jobs. Working two remote jobs has a number of benefits. First of all, you’ll be able to set your own hours and work around your other commitments. Secondly, you’ll be able to work from anywhere in the world, as long as you have an internet connection. And finally, you’ll have the satisfaction of knowing that you’re doing your bit to help the environment by working from home.

Of course, there are a few things you should bear in mind if you’re thinking of getting two remote jobs. Firstly, make sure that you’re well organized and can handle working on multiple projects at the same time. Secondly, communication is key – make sure you keep your bosses updated on your progress and let them know if there are any problems. And finally, be prepared to put in some extra hours when necessary – sometimes working from home can be a bit lonely, so it’s important to be flexible.

Overall, working two remote jobs is a great way to earn some extra money and or get ahead in your career. So what are you waiting for? Start applying for those jobs today!

If you’re anything like me, the idea of having two remote jobs is incredibly appealing. Not only would I get to work from home (hello, no commute!), but I could also take my work with me wherever I go. It seems too good to be true, right? As it turns out, working two remote jobs is not only possible, but it can also have some major benefits. So if you’re thinking about making the switch to a dual-remote career, here are a few things you should know first. Need additional help making the transition? Connect with me here.

Resources:

Smartphone Millionaire Book & Todd Capital Options Trading

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