Risks of Overemployment!

If you’re like me, the idea of overemployed is pretty appealing. It would mean I could work from anywhere I want and never have to worry about finding a new job again. But before you quit your day job to start applying for your dream position, there are a few things you should consider. Being overemployed can be risky, especially if one of them is your main source of income. Here are a few things to keep in mind before make the switch.

#1 If one or both employers find out you are overemployed
What should you do if your boss finds out you have a second job? What if they discover you’ve been working remotely for another company? The first thing to do is stay calm. There’s no need to panic or make any rash decisions. If your boss asks you about it, be honest and open with them. Explain that you’re passionate about your work and that you’re looking for ways to challenge yourself. You may also want to mention that you’re doing it for the extra income. If your boss is okay with it, great! If not, you may need to choose between the two jobs. Ultimately, it’s up to you which job is more important to you. But if you can find a way to keep both, that’s even better!

#2 Check for Non-Compete Agreements
If you’re thinking about taking on a remote job, there’s one potential pitfall you’ll want to avoid: non-compete agreements. What are non-compete agreements? They’re basically contracts that prevent you from working for a competitor of your current employer. And if you have one, it could limit your ability to take on a new remote job.

So how can you tell if you have a non-compete agreement? The best way is to check your employment contract. If it includes language about not working for a competitor, then you have a non-compete agreement. Alternatively, you can ask your employer directly. They should be able to tell you if you’re bound by a non-compete agreement or not.

If you do have a non-compete agreement, that doesn’t necessarily mean you can’t take on a remote job. However, you’ll need to be careful about which job you choose. Make sure that the company you’re considering is not in direct competition with your current employer. Otherwise, you could find yourself in violation of your contract.

Bottom line: if you’re thinking about getting a remote job, take the time to check for non-compete agreements.

#3 If the employer(s) find out about your overemployment…just be honest
So, you’ve been caught with your hand in the cookie jar – or, more accurately, with two remote jobs. What should you do?
First, take a deep breath. It’s not the end of the world. You can handle this. Next, sit down with your employer and explain the situation honestly. They may be understanding and give you some leeway. Or they may not be happy about it, but as long as you’re upfront with them, they’ll respect your honesty. Finally, depending on your employer’s reaction, you may need to choose between your two jobs. If they’re both great opportunities, it’s up to you to decide which one you want to keep. But if one is clearly better than the other, maybe it’s time to cut your losses and focus on the job that’s a better fit for you.

#4 Keep Your Overemployed Status to Yourself
If you’re working two remote jobs, there’s no need to tell your coworkers. In fact, it’s probably best to keep it a secret. Here are a few reasons why: First, you’ll be able to get twice as much work done if your coworkers aren’t constantly coming to you with questions or distractions. Second, you’ll be able to focus better if you’re not worrying about what your coworkers think of you. And finally, if word gets out that you’re working two jobs, you may find yourself in the position of having to justify why you’re doing it. So save yourself the hassle and keep your second job a secret. Your coworkers will thank you for it.

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Career Revamp Intro

I want to make sure that you guys understand that I’m with you in the fight to getting your economic life intact. I will be starting either later on this week or next week a career revamp series to help you get back on track if you’ve lost your job, or you just need a new career path.

There will be a lot of helpful tips and really just guidance to get you guys back to where to where you want to be.

This pandemic has changed the scope of our economics so quickly that this career revamp is going to be created to help you recover victoriously, if you do the work.

Check out the link below for some of the resources I have available for you to get started on your personal career revamp.

Need to get a complete resume overhaul? Go here

Just need your resume reviewed for top performance? Check out this resource

Other ways to work with me.

Connect with me here.

Why is a “Summary Statement” needed on your resume?

I know you hear me talking about how important resumes are in your career development but don’t ignore it.. Did you know that your “well written” resume helps to communicate your your skills, knowledge based and qualifications to potential employers? Do you understand that it showcase what you can do for employers, when written strategically?

I need you to truly understand your resume is the advertisement for the business of YOU! Let that sink in for a moment. Do you think you didn’t have to sell when looking for jobs or career opportunities? Think again!

There are five to six key elements to an efficiently written resume. In this article, we will discuss one of the most important attention grabbing elements.

Your SUMMARY STATEMENTS (Summary Paragraph)
So, you’re asking me, what is a summary statement on a resume. It is a one to three statements communicating your specific years of expertise, knowledge base and skills relevant to the industry or position(s) for which you are applying. This paragraph should mention specific key words associated with the actual position, so it may change frequently based on the position(s). If you are over the age of forty years old, you may have some familiarity with the “OBJECTIVE” on a resume. The summary paragraph took the place of the objective and communicated more efficiently with the employer about what you have to offer.

Do you have a summary paragraph on your resume? If not, here is a sample I provided to one of my clients when I completed a full resume revision for them. They were applying for social work and youth rehabilitation type of positions for group homes and orphanages.

Solid 20+ years of results oriented experience in social work and youth counseling with strong emphasis in teaching youth self-control, life skills, self-esteem and self-motivation. Consistently exceeding company goals and service expectations. Skilled in developing and implementing standardized policies and procedures that tangibly improved the lives of the youth population systematically.”

Now, this summary paragraph gave the employer a snapshot of what my client’s skills, their capabilities and their years of experience accomplishing the goals in their role. Now, keep in mind, the rest of the resume should quantify all the statements in the summary paragraph but it paints a great picture of my client so far.

By the way, does your resume have a summary paragraph helping to sell your skills, knowledge base, experience and qualification? If not, then a couple of resources to help you with that. If you’re looking to have your resume reviewed to see if it is working for you…then check out my first resource here. If you need your resume to be complete rewritten or created because you don’t have one or have a ineffective one….then check out my second resource here.

I want you to win in your career and your economic life, so your #1 career tool, also known as your resume, must work for you, not against you. If you have any questions about resumes, careers, interviewing or negotiation strategies, you can leave me a voicemail message by clicking the gray “send voicemail” tab on the right side of the page or go here and send me an email.

Competition in the #Workplace…Good or Bad?

Don’t like the unhealthy competition you have to deal with at work & want to find better #careeropportunity? Get your career tools ready by going here.

Want to suggest a career or job related topic? Leave a comment or touch bases with me here.

Resume Must Haves: Summary of Qualifications

Happy New Year to all my listeners & viewers! Hope you enjoyed your holidays. Let’s get started on the right way in 2019 with your #careertools.

Your #resume is one of the most important career tool you have to help you take advantage of job opportunities, so make sure it’s ready.

To have your resume reviewed & truly working for you, check out my resource here.

If need a new resume completed, then go here.

Still have other career related questions and want to connect? Do so here.

Two things must be on your resume in 2019

What must your resume have in 2019?

1. Your summary that includes qualifications and knowledge specific to the job you are applying for.

2. List the relevant skills and experience displayed in bullet points. Keep in mind you are giving the applicant tracking system (ATS) and the hiring manager a quick summary of what you can do for them.

If you are looking to have your resume updated to reflect 2019 standards, check out my resource here.

If you don’t have a resume and need one completed, so you can take advantage of 2019 career goals…go here to have your resume completed and working for you in the marketplace, not against you.

Still have general career related questions? Contact me here

Is Your Resume Doing You Justice?

The primary function of your #resume is to pique the interest of the #employer enough to get a job interview. If you’re not getting calls from employers for more information what you have to offer, then this career tool is not doing its job for you.

Want to have all your career tools such as your resumes, cover letters and/or letters of recommendation reviewed by an human resources professional to improve their chances of working for you? Go check out this resource where I review all your career tools…so they can start working in your favor.

Connect with me HERE.

Show & Tell with Your Career Tools

If you don’t have any of your career tools completed and need to get them done, let’s get started by you going here.

If you have career tools but need them optimized to get hire employers attention, then check out my resource here.

Connect with me here.